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20120916
20120916
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CNN 2
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 1
MSNBC 1
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNN
Sep 16, 2012 2:00pm PDT
that's erupting. starting with kcairo. benghazi and now, beyond. you wrote an op-ed "the new york times" about all of this saying the republicans are in disarray, they're divided about national security and foreign policy. so, did mr. romney's handling, his comments following the unrest in egypt further kind of underscore a real girth of understanding if not confusion? >> yeah, it's a little bit of both and i think if you see mitt romney hours after our top diplomat and three other americans were murdered in libya, he was trying to use this as a political case and then the reaction to romney within his own party. many republicans shaking their heads and criticizing and saying this is not the moment. some even noting that when reagan and george h.w. bush ran for president in 1980 and we had servicemen killed trying to rescue hostages in iran, reagan didn't politicize that moment, neither did bush, so it seems that the republican party has lost its way. there are so many splits inside of the party about spending and how do we predict power in the world that many republicans really don't k
MSNBC
Sep 16, 2012 9:00am PDT
assessment is that what happened in benghazi was, in fact, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo. almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo, which were prompted, of course, by the video. what we think then transpired in benghazi is that opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. they came with heavy weapons, which unfortunately are readily available in post-revolutionary libya, and they escalated into a much more violent episode. >> nbc is live for us in benghazi, libya. let's talk about the u.s. officials who are on the ground now. how many of the suspects are in custody and are there any leads on other suspects? >> alex, we had the chance yesterday to speak to libya's president, head of the general national council here. he told us he did agree with ambassador rice on one point. he believes this was a sinister, preplanned attack. this was the hallmark of foreign militants who had come into libya to exploit the security vacuum here and planned a very specific attack against the united
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 3:00pm EDT
, with benghazi, with so many dictators, they were supporting them because it suit at that time the strategic interests and the economic interests. so the point for me was to deal with this and to be very cautious with wording. i was not buying from the very beginning this perception, oh, it's the arab spring, these are revolutions. i started by saying let us be cautiously optimistic. something is happening which is great. and what is great is what i call in the book and in the title the awakening. and the awakening is the awakening of the arab mind and the intellectual revolution with people understanding, yes, it's possible to get rid of dictators, it's possible to change the country. this is irreversible. that cannot be chaingd. and this is something which is a legacy, a shift which is very promising for the now and for the future. now to speak about revolutions that are achieved and i don't know, i still don't know. so i don't know today if what is happening in egypt is an unfinished or an unachieved revolution. i don't know what is happening with what is happening in tunisia that we are,
CNN
Sep 16, 2012 3:00am PDT
including ambassador chris stevens. they were killed in benghazi last week. this is the video of the gutted out consulate. it's believe the attack was planned by al qaeda operatives. >>> now to california. na cue la basseley na cue la talked yesterday. part of it hinges on his past. >> it was all choreographed. there were conversations between the federal probation officers and him. he was ready and willing and very cooperative it's unknown where nakoula went after the interview. >>> now, let's move to egypt where protesters had gathered for several ys for anti-american demonstrations but now it turns out not all of the protesters were there because of their anger toward the u.s. and the anti-muslim interview. they were there because they were getting paid to be there. our cnn international correspondent ben wedeman is there. ben, good morning. >> reporter: this is the egyptian prime minister who made that claim in an interview with the bbc arabic service. of course, we've heard this before. in fact, a cnn official of the muslim brotherhood mention thad some of the protesters are being paid
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)